Argumentation tools – Concession

In a period of my life I worked for a big company, my job was at customers site doing some advanced product troubleshooting and configuration. Some customer employees always had this predisposition to gently degrading the image of the company products, referring the quantity and severity of bugs in them. At first I was upset by this, and I tried to defend with all arguments I knew, however, my manager told me to not do it that way. He told me to accept the critic from the customer, and telling them that they were right. Really? What? He said to me: First, the comments are true, you cannot say it is false, its a fact, if you defend this you are creating breaches in your character reputation (more about character in a future post). Second, after telling them this, they don’t have any more arguments to say, it is out of the way, now you could talk about the qualities of the product when compared with the other vendors products. You could focus your argument in the advantages over other products and why the customer chose our products and not the others. So, you conceded, for a while, the “advantage” to your audience, but then you get the upper hand, because the “bad quality” issue was already resolved and there is nothing more to talk about it! A kind of jujitsu in the language! It is like a sports game, you accept an attack from the other team just to open their defense, and then counter-attack.
You can apply this kind of tool to anything in your life. Usually a good salesman never say no to a customer, he hears the customer, accept his arguments (for a while) and then he counter-attacks with his sales tools, and it works quite well! “Yes, the car is expensive, but have you observed all you can get with that price?”
Another angle is, when someone is trying to win some kind of argumentation against you, and you know that its just something that he/she doesn’t really know well, just keep hearing and let them talk, concede the “advantage”, for a while, and you will see how they hang themselves in their own argument.
By curiosity, this tool was used by Gandhi (at least in the movie) when he cites the Christian Bible “If someone forces you to go one mile, go with him two miles.” (the argument is more extensive, but the idea is the same)
In chess, we call this a gambit, sacrificing something for future advantage.

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